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Buy Milk Thistle Plant


Milk thistle, a regulated Class A noxious weed, is a toxic, branching winter annual or biennial that grows 2-6 feet tall in disturbed areas, such as pastures, roadsides, ditches, and fencerows. Ingestion can cause nitrate poisoning in cattle and sheep. Young plants grow as rosettes. Shiny green leaves have distinct white marbling patterns, with spines on leaf edges and stems. In April-October, pink-purple flower heads, with broad, spiny bracts at their bases, appear singly at stem ends. Reproduces via seeds that persist in soil at least 9 years. This plant has a limited distribution in King County, concentrated in rural areas.




buy milk thistle plant


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Milk thistle is a large and highly distinctive thistle, with white marbling on the shiny green leaves. Flowerheads are bright magenta or purple, with thick, fleshy, spine-tipped bracts protruding around the base off the flowerhead. Leaves, stems and flowers are all armed with stiff, sharp spines.


Milk thistle is a Class A noxious weed in Washington State and eradication is required. Property owners in King County are required to remove this plant if it occurs on their property and the King County Noxious Weed Program will assist property owners with the control of this Class A noxious weed if requested.Although occasionally found in gardens, it is illegal to sell or buy milk thistle in Washington State. The species is on the Washington quarantine list (known as the prohibited plants list) and it is prohibited to transport, buy, sell, offer for sale, or to distribute plants or plant parts, seeds in packets, blends or "wildflower mixes" of this species, into or within the state of Washington. All existing plantings should be removed in order to prevent accidental spread.


Please notify us if you see milk thistle in King County. Our program staff can provide the property owner or appropriate public agency with site-specific advice on how best to remove it. We map all known locations of regulated noxious weeds such as milk thistle in order to help us and others locate new infestations in time to control them.


  • Although milk thistle, specifically the active ingredient in the plant called silymarin, has been used a herbal remedy for 2,000 years, is it not recommended that you consume or use milk thistle plants in any form."}},"@type": "Question","name": "Are there native thistles that I can plant instead of milk thistle?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "One of the most diverse native thistles is the Cirsium genus with more than 62 species. To determine which native thistle is best suited to your area, contact the native plant society in your state, or a local native plant nursery.","@type": "Question","name": "How are the seeds of milk thistle spread?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Most of the seeds drop near the plant but they can also be moved by erosion,wildlife, pets, rain, and human activity, such as on the wheels of a lawn mower."]}]}] .icon-garden-review-1fill:#b1dede.icon-garden-review-2fill:none;stroke:#01727a;stroke-linecap:round;stroke-linejoin:round > buttonbuttonThe Spruce The Spruce's Instagram The Spruce's TikTok The Spruce's Pinterest The Spruce's Facebook NewslettersClose search formOpen search formSearch DecorRoom Design

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Milk thistle is considered an invasive plant, or at the very least, listed as a noxious weed by several states. In some locations, such as in Washington State, selling or buying milk thistle is actually illegal and existing plants must be removed.


Although milk thistle, specifically the active ingredient in the plant called silymarin, has been used a herbal remedy for 2,000 years, is it not recommended that you consume or use milk thistle plants in any form.


One of the most diverse native thistles is the Cirsium genus with more than 62 species. To determine which native thistle is best suited to your area, contact the native plant society in your state, or a local native plant nursery.


If you have diabetes, use milk thistle with caution, since the supplement might lower blood sugar. There is also concern that milk thistle might affect estrogen levels. If you have breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis or uterine fibroids, consider avoiding milk thistle.


Milk thistle can cause an allergic reaction, including a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis). An allergic reaction is more common in people who are allergic to other plants in the Asteraceae family, such as ragweed, daisies, marigolds and chrysanthemums.


Milk thistle helps rejuvenate the liver and supports it by protecting it from damaging substances and is often prescribed by herbalists for livers suffering alcohol damage, hepatitis and cirrhosis. All parts of the plant are edible, but the leaves are truly spikey and need careful handling. The seed is the most beneficial part of the herb and can be harvested ground and eaten.


Traditionally crushed seeds are infused to make a cooling bitter tasting tea that increases breast milk in nursing mothers.It is commonly taken to treat the liver and gallbladder or over indulgence.The seeds are harvested when the petals turn brown, by cutting the individual flowers from the stems; it is advisable to wear protective gloves when doing this. The flower heads should then be put in a paper bag and shaken daily. The seeds will collect at the bottom of the bag.


We deliver our herb plants to addresses across the UK. Orders are dispatched between Mondays and Thursdays. This is usually within two to four days of placing your order, but at some points of the year during busy peaks it may take a little longer.


Established over twenty years ago, we are a specialist and family-run herb nursery offering a fantastic range of culinary, medicinal and aromatic herbs for sale. Grown naturally and in harmony with the seasons as well as the local environment and wildlife, we supply strong and healthy plants that flourish in your home or garden.


On warm, sunny spring days, we marvel at the number of pollinators visiting our milk thistle flowers. Often, multiple pollinator species are foraging together on a single flower, including our personal favorite: Agapostemon splendens, a native, metallic green ground-dwelling bee.


The fact that thistle plants also pose a health risk to cattle and other ruminants due to their unique digestive systems, has also earned milk thistle a negative reputation with ranchers and farmers throughout the US.


Yes, milk thistle has proven medicinal value, but more research is needed. Complicating matters, much of the current research is conducted using only one primary milk thistle compound, silymarin, rather than using the entire seed and the potential synergies that take place between the full compounds found therein.


Milk thistle has been used for thousands of years to treat various ailments, particularly liver problems. Modern science is beginning to show that milk thistle has a wide range of health and medicinal benefits.


And rather than treating yourself with milk thistle for mushroom poisoning, we strongly advise you to use our 12 rules of foraging to avoid ever eating a poisonous plant or mushroom in the first place!


There are many wild milk thistles where I live, nowadays their seeds are unripe, white and easily crush by hands, are they edible and as useful as matured seeds if I eat them? Because I have little liver problems


Hello, By chance this herb grows wild in Western North Carolina and I have organic seed coming in now. If you would like some seeds I would love to send you some for barter or donation small donation. Right now the plants are in beautiful bloom and will be ready to send you in a month. I will be happy to send the seed ASAP but you will have to let them dry in a paper bag. Remember this plant multiplies quickly. One plant can produce many flowers and the roots I am told will be tough to kill off. My plants started a few years ago and this year are producing fast!I am trying to increase my income so I am testing out the product this year. Please check with your Agriculture exchange before you plant in the ground the may not want you to plant this herb due to its fast growth and nuance that it can cause. Check with Google how to plant new seeds and if you need to let them dry our first. Please reply to [email protected] 041b061a72


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